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The IFRS Interpretations Committee (Committee) discussed the following matter and tentatively decided not to add a standard-setting project to the work plan. The Committee will reconsider this tentative decision, including the reasons for not adding a standard-setting project, at a future meeting. The Committee invites comments on the tentative agenda decision. All comments will be on the public record and posted on our website unless a respondent requests confidentiality and we grant that request. We do not normally grant such requests unless they are supported by good reason, for example, commercial confidence.

Tentative Agenda Decision

The Committee received a request about a lessor’s application of IFRS 9 and IFRS 16 in accounting for a particular rent concession. The rent concession is one for which the only change to the lease contract is the lessor’s forgiveness of lease payments due from the lessee under that contract

The fact pattern

The request described a rent concession agreed by a lessor and a lessee on the date the rent concession is granted. For the lessor, the rent concession changes a lease contract classified—applying IFRS 16—as an operating lease. The lessor legally releases the lessee from its obligation to make specifically identified lease payments, some of which are amounts contractually due but not paid (which the lessor had recognised as an operating lease receivable) and some of which are amounts that are not yet contractually due. No other changes are made to the lease contract, nor are there any other negotiations between the lessor and the lessee that might affect the accounting for the rent concession. Before the date the rent concession is granted, the lessor had applied the expected credit loss model in IFRS 9 to the operating lease receivable.

The question

The submitter asked:

  1. how the lessor applies the expected credit loss model in IFRS 9 to the operating lease receivable when it expects to forgive payments due from the lessee under the lease contract before the rent concession is granted; and
  2. whether the lessor applies the derecognition requirements in IFRS 9 or the lease modification requirements in IFRS 16 in accounting for the rent concession.

Applying the expected credit loss model in IFRS 9 to the operating lease receivable

Paragraph 2.1(b)(i) of IFRS 9 states that ‘operating lease receivables recognised by a lessor are subject to the derecognition and impairment requirements’ of IFRS 9. Therefore, a lessor is required to apply the impairment requirements in IFRS 9 to an operating lease receivable from the date on which it recognises that receivable.

IFRS 9 defines credit loss as ‘the difference between all contractual cash flows that are due to an entity in accordance with the contract and all the cash flows that the entity expects to receive (ie all cash shortfalls)…’. Paragraph 5.5.17 of IFRS 9 states that ‘an entity shall measure expected credit losses…in a way that reflects (a) an unbiased and probability-weighted amount that is determined by evaluating a range of possible outcomes; (b) the time value of money; and (c) reasonable and supportable information that is available without undue cost or effort at the reporting date about past events, current conditions and forecasts of future economic conditions’.

Consequently, in the fact pattern described in the request, the lessor applies the impairment requirements in IFRS 9 to the operating lease receivable. The lessor estimates expected credit losses on the operating lease receivable by measuring any credit loss to reflect ‘all cash shortfalls’. These shortfalls are the difference between all contractual cash flows due to the lessor in accordance with the lease contract and all the cash flows it expects to receive, determined using ‘reasonable and supportable information’ about ‘past events, current conditions and forecasts of future economic conditions’.

Therefore, the Committee concluded that, in the period before the rent concession is granted, the lessor measures expected credit losses on the operating lease receivable in a way that reflects an unbiased and probability-weighted amount determined by evaluating a range of possible outcomes (as required by paragraph 5.5.17 of IFRS 9), including considering its expectations of forgiving lease payments recognised as part of that receivable.

Lessor accounting for the rent concession—IFRS 9 and IFRS 16

Applying the derecognition requirements in IFRS 9 to the operating lease receivable

Paragraph 2.1(b)(i) of IFRS 9 states that operating lease receivables recognised by a lessor are subject to the derecognition requirements in IFRS 9. Consequently, on granting the rent concession, the lessor considers whether the requirements for derecognition in paragraph 3.2.3 of IFRS 9 are met.

In the rent concession described in the request, the lessor legally releases the lessee from its obligation to make specifically identified lease payments, some of which the lessor had recognised as an operating lease receivable. Accordingly, on granting the rent concession, the lessor concludes that the requirements in paragraph 3.2.3(a) of IFRS 9 have been met—that is, its contractual rights to the cash flows from the operating lease receivable expire—because it has agreed to legally release the lessee from its obligation and thus has given up its contractual rights to those specifically identified cash flows. Therefore, on the date the rent concession is granted, the lessor derecognises the operating lease receivable (and associated expected credit loss allowance) and recognises any difference as a loss in profit or loss.

Applying the lease modification requirements in IFRS 16 to future lease payments under the lease

The rent concession described in the request meets the definition of a lease modification in IFRS 16. The rent concession is ‘a change to the consideration for the lease…that was not part of the original terms and conditions of the lease’. Therefore, the lessor applies paragraph 87 of IFRS 16 and accounts for the modified lease as a new lease from the date the rent concession is granted.

Paragraph 87 of IFRS 16 requires a lessor to consider any prepaid or accrued lease payments relating to the original lease as part of the lease payments for the new lease. The Committee observed that lease payments due from the lessee that the lessor has recognised as an operating lease receivable (to which the derecognition and impairment requirements in IFRS 9 apply) are not accrued lease payments. Consequently, neither those lease payments nor their forgiveness are considered part of the lease payments for the new lease.

In accounting for the modified lease as a new lease, a lessor applies paragraph 81 of IFRS 16 and recognises as income the lease payments to be made by the lessee over the lease term (including any prepaid or accrued lease payments relating to the original lease) on either a straight-line basis or another systematic basis.

The Committee concluded that the lessor accounts for the rent concession described in the request by applying:

  1. the derecognition requirements in IFRS 9 to forgiven lease payments that the lessor had included in an operating lease receivable on the date the rent concession is granted; an
  2. the lease modification requirements in IFRS 16 to forgiven lease payments that the lessor had not included in an operating lease receivable.

The Committee concluded that the principles and requirements in IFRS Accounting Standards provide an adequate basis for a lessor to determine how to apply the expected credit loss model in IFRS 9 to an operating lease receivable and account for the rent concession described in the request. Consequently, the Committee [decided] not to add a standard-setting project to the work plan.

The deadline for commenting on the tentative agenda decision is 23 May 2022. The Committee will consider all comments received in writing by that date; agenda papers analysing comments received will include analysis only of comments received by that date.
 

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